Subject Not Object

Interview with featured artist Georgia Gibson

Georgia Gibson is an artist working out of Durham. Her work can be seen in the most recent Subject Not Object exhibit, as well as at her online portfolio

Your combined interest in ceramics and performance art is something that is not often seen as two intersecting mediums. What is your experience in performance art and how has your work with ceramics informed or enhanced that work? 

Well, I’d say ceramics and sculpture was mostly the main medium I’m interested in at the moment. However, that has made me focus quite often on the significance of objects, and how I can photograph objects in ways which make sense with my art- this was what originally lead me to performance art. I feel like in photography we’re often missing the full potential of a piece, and I really want to take that further. I really love performance art as whole, I love the whole scene it has and it’s major influences (I’m a huge Marina Abramovic fan), but a largely want to change it’s typical style to be more relevant to my own practice- I want to make performance art that reflects my ceramics in terms of being pink and feminine, instead of shooting films in grainy black and white. I really hope to use more of my own sculpture work in my performances in the future. 


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Your work is quite popular with the zine community, specifically feminism focused, was this something you made a conscious effort to have happen, or was it more organic? As in, you published work in Grrrl Asylum which then got the attention of Girls Don’t Do that, which then led you to … and so on and so on. 


I think it was a bit of both. I’ve been putting my work online for about a year now, and within that process I’ve met a lot of artists who think similarly, who also know other artists, who also know other artist, who know other artists… and I think it just kinda snowballs. Sometimes I submit to zines that I love the look of, and sometimes I specifically get emails/messages asking me if I’d be interested in contributing to publications they have in the works. I think the latter largely stems from being involved in networks such as The Pulp Zine and Cherry Mag, they’ve helped get my name out there quite a lot as they have quite a solid following. 


You’ve got quite an impressive twitter following. Do you attribute that to your presence in the tumblr/zine scene or the endless self promoting that artists and designers and creatives in general have to do to be seen? Did publishing “Beyoncé on her Period” online have a significant effect on the attention your work was getting online?

I think the twitter following is largely just from being part of the ‘tumblr scene’. I’ve had tumblr for around 4 years, only posting art for the last of those years, so I’ve gained quite a few followers before I began creating. Funnily enough, the glitter piece (which was originally called ‘I don’t only have glitter in my veins’) got me very little recognition, even though it’s my most well known piece. It was used constantly on twitter with no credit, and even when I was posting it myself on instagram and such I was having friends comment saying ‘is this yours?’- it was really really amusing, I was almost treated as if I’d stole the work because so many people had already seen in on parody Beyonce twitter accounts. I’d hate to be the type of person to care too much about recognition, I mean of course I would like to be a recognised artist but realistically I’m just happy that the work is out there and people are seeing it. 


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What initially drew you towards studying art? As a student have you ever questioned the work that you’re making, or rather gone through a sudden and dramatic change in medium and subject matter? 


I actually never wanted to be an artist growing up! I kinda just took it at college as something fun to do, as my two other subjects I was studying (classics and philosophy) were quite hard going. I only really got into art after doing a project on feminism and rape culture- I think it was definitely feminist art that really roped me in. I originally started off my art practice doing mythology and women in mythology, then moved to feminism and rape culture, then body shaming, and I now work largely around the theme of sexuality and how it’s represented through different occurrences. I think I quite needed that natural flow through topics to find the right subject matter for me, I don’t think I’d go back to any of my past topics now. 

Exhibition 1



Berivan Sayici, Video for the Performance Transforming Hysterical Misery Into Common Unhappiness @Transformer Vienna 2013. Voice over taken from the documentary MARILYN ON MARILYN and is from Marilyn’s last interview july 1962





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Georgia Gibson, The Confused Housewife Tea Party, 2014 




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Taylor Goldstein, Anti-Eden 1, Mixed Media, 8’x10’x9’, 2013




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Taylor Goldstein, Anti-Eden 2, Mixed Media, 8’x10’x9’, 2013




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Taylor Goldstein, Anti-Eden 3, Mixed Media, 8’x10’x9’, 2013




Jessica Buie, Queer Presence in the Digital Landscape, video, 2014

Statement on queering the digital landscape







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Two identical panties worn by Tim Kelly and Arvida Byström. Once off and sealed in plastic, no one to knows who worn which.

Photography and art pieces by Arvida Byström from Charlotte Cullen’s show Intimates’ index. 2013.











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Kyle Quinn, I’ve Cum For You,






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Florian Tenk, from Now Tell Me That I’ve Seen You Naked





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Kallie Pfeiffer, Stringing Sanity, 2014






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Georgia Gibson, The Confused Housewife Pottery Club, handmade/painted ceramic, 2014






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Florian Tenk, from Now Tell Me That I’ve Seen You Naked





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Kallie Pfeiffer, Carving into Zen, 2013

My artwork incorporates coping mechanisms that are associated with psychological disorders to address how the body reacts to the psyche under stress. I am interested in challenging viewers to analyze their own interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships as well as those that occur between the characters I present.

I intend to share narratives that derive from both symbiotic and parasitic relationships in order to shed light not only on the person experiencing psychological traumas, but also on the persons who attempt to console the inconsolable. 








For one year I maintained two profiles on a popular breast-implant donation and social networking site: one profile as a “Model” named Sunny, and one as a “Benefactor” named Benny. On this site, (mostly) men offer small donations towards (mostly) women’s breast implants in exchange for photos and videos that are usually pornographic. This year of online performance served as a kind of social research into this unique community, processed through my own analysis of gender, labor, and body politics. Sunny and Benny’s adventures are chronicled in a coin-operated lecture, delivered at a rate of 25¢ per two minutes of lecture. The lecture slides are screen captures from Sunny and Benny’s interactions on the site with eager Benefactors, sales-pitching models, and a few surprising friends. Their stories are also recounted in a series of videos, including a gender-morphing burlesque dance installed in a special coin-op booth.” 

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Sunita Prasad, Sunny + Benny Together ForeverLecture Performance, Videos, & Installation







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Jessica Buie, The Impenetrable Digital Self, 2014






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Kallie Pfeiffer, Grounded, 2013





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Kyle Quinn, from I’ve Cum For You



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"Wifi for Wife" at Gallery Bon, Sweden 2014. Photos from an ~almost~ solo show, curated and featuring work by Arvida Byström and a video by Jillian Mayer





Curator’s Statement: Exhibition 1

The collection of these works was made through the categorization of anti-normativity. The curators of this exhibit looked to gather a set of images and videos that skirt the traditional aesthetic values and expectations of popular art and culture. Through this selection process, the question of what is anti-normative began to speak louder and louder. We were forced to ask ourselves and each other over and over again, what does it mean to be separate, whether willingly or forcibly, from the established boundaries of normativity? 

We soon discovered it is not just one defining quality or identity or opinion that makes someone or something anti-normative, similar to the public’s strict definitions and expectations that exceedingly categorize people based on single definitions of themselves. We discovered that it was not up to us to determine who fits in these categories and who does not. 

The work presented here represents a multitude of disparate identities. The artists, doubly so. While we do not desire to be defined by single attributes, neither does the work that we make. From Georgia Gibson’s simultaneously delicate and jarring depictions of the stifling qualifications of select gender identities to Berivan Sayici’s commanding examinations of bodily desire and femininity, these artists represent no single category nor definition. They are on the edges of what is draconically considered acceptable and expected not because anyone placed them there, but because they themselves recognize and celebrate their unique individualities. 

The curators of Subject Not Object warmly welcome you to the inaugural first of many online exhibitions. Enjoy. 

Subject Not Object is looking for submissions for our monthly playlists. You don’t have to be a DJ, just throw together a playlist of what you’re currently listening to and send it our way. We’ll take care of the rest. 

Playlists should be between 13-20 songs

A collective group of non-normative creators. 
Subject Not Object is a curatorial and conceptual attempt at promoting and preserving creations with interests in queer identity, disrupting institutionalized patriarchy, networked action against any systematic prejudice found in the digital landscape, and creation of safe spaces online. 
Subject Not Object produces small press publications, as well as both online and offline public exhibitions. 
Works of art, curatorial proposals, and other things you would like to have considered for publication both online and in print may be sent to 
subjectnotobject@gmail.com 
Please include your name, contact information, title of proposed works, low-res attachments of the work you are submitting, and a short statement on the works. 

A collective group of non-normative creators. 

Subject Not Object is a curatorial and conceptual attempt at promoting and preserving creations with interests in queer identity, disrupting institutionalized patriarchy, networked action against any systematic prejudice found in the digital landscape, and creation of safe spaces online. 

Subject Not Object produces small press publications, as well as both online and offline public exhibitions. 

Works of art, curatorial proposals, and other things you would like to have considered for publication both online and in print may be sent to 

subjectnotobject@gmail.com 

Please include your name, contact information, title of proposed works, low-res attachments of the work you are submitting, and a short statement on the works. 

Out Of The Kitchen, Onto Your Screen, Into The Ether: A Case For An Online Art and Feminism Social Movement by Angela Washk

The internet has always been and continues to be a boys club. Women who choose to delve deeper into the net than amazon.com don’t have to look far to find themselves bombarded by the proliferation of archaic negative gender-based stereotypes in virtually every space including online games (40,59), meme culture (30,31,32), forums, online journalism, YouTube, and beyond. Every major platform and communication model online appears to be a megaphone for men to remind women that they don’t belong or that they’re only allowed to participate if they accept their role as objects of admiration or quiet non-opinionated users in the event they aren’t deemed attractive enough (23).

A collective group of non-normative creators. 
Subject Not Object is a curatorial and conceptual attempt at promoting and preserving creations with interests in queer identity, disrupting institutionalized patriarchy, networked action against any systematic prejudice found in the digital landscape, and creation of safe spaces online. 
Subject Not Object produces small press publications, as well as both online and offline public exhibitions. 
Works of art, curatorial proposals, and other things you would like to have considered for publication both online and in print may be sent to 
subjectnotobject@gmail.com 

Please include your name, contact information, title of proposed works, low-res attachments of the work you are submitting, and a short statement on the works. 

A collective group of non-normative creators. 

Subject Not Object is a curatorial and conceptual attempt at promoting and preserving creations with interests in queer identity, disrupting institutionalized patriarchy, networked action against any systematic prejudice found in the digital landscape, and creation of safe spaces online. 

Subject Not Object produces small press publications, as well as both online and offline public exhibitions. 

Works of art, curatorial proposals, and other things you would like to have considered for publication both online and in print may be sent to 

subjectnotobject@gmail.com 

Please include your name, contact information, title of proposed works, low-res attachments of the work you are submitting, and a short statement on the works.